Higher Education

Outsourcing helps schools save money without cutting jobs

Outsourcing. When you see that word, you probably think about jobs being shipped overseas, or longtime employees being cut to hire younger – and cheaper – workers.

But outsourcing doesn’t have to be a dirty word, and it can actually help schools and districts save money without laying off existing staff.

By bringing in a support services firm like SSC, schools can:

  • Keep the current, knowledgeable staff already in-house
  • Increase productivity
  • Stop worrying about workers’ compensation, skyrocketing fringe costs, and free up human resources to focus on other responsibilities
  • Save money – 15-20 percent – which can then go to other critical needs, like arts programs and teacher pay
  • Most importantly, improve the look of your schools and make your district more competitive in recruitment and retention


We have developed a detailed transition plan honed through the successful onboarding of hundreds of thousands of associates over many years. This experience has taught us that honest, open, continuous communication is the key to taking employees from a place of fear and resistance to embracing the positive new reality our solutions bring and delivering a new, higher level of performance.

SSC leverages its expertise and resources to achieve significantly higher productivity levels using technology, training and management resources that are beyond the reach of in-house operations.

Eighty percent of a support service’s department budget is labor. Higher productivity means fewer workers – and a lower cost – but an increased quality in facilities management.

But wait, you’re thinking, you said we could save money without cutting a bunch of jobs.

You’re right. That’s where attrition comes in.

Gradual employee transition happens naturally, at a rate around 10 percent annually. As worker productivity increases, vacant positions can be eliminated while maintaining a high standard of work. Staffing levels go down without forcing employees out of their jobs and without breaking promises with the school community.

In this structure, cost-savings are attained in a way that’s sustainable and respectful of existing employees, and that maintains good morale and a spirit of teamwork.

When Lake Travis Independent School District in Texas transitioned custodial services to SSC in 2015, 92 percent of staff members also decided to make the transition, and the district was able to save 18 percent of its prior year’s custodial budget.

“The positive feedback has been overwhelming,” said Johnny W. Hill, assistant superintendent for business, financial and auxiliary services at Lake Travis ISD.

“In my opinion, the three main factors that set SSC apart from the rest of the crowd (are) their level of commitment to employees during the transition period, their commitment to providing the highest level of services to the educational entity and, finally, their commitment to providing a cost-effective solution to their clients.”

Want to learn more? Get in touch with us to see if outsourcing support services makes sense for your facilities.

For more stories like this, subscribe to the SSC Monthly newsletter. Get news about the latest trends in education and support services, plus tips from our knowledgeable and experienced staff about how to make your facilities run smoothly — and save money.

How SSC helped Texas A&M weather Hurricane Harvey

In late summer 2017, the areas surrounding Texas A&M saw considerable winds and rain from Hurricane Harvey. The weather event caused massive devastation, leaving in its path leveled homes, businesses, schools, nursing homes, churches and stores, and injuring or killing many. In situations such as this, our SSC team knows it is vital to be prepared, responsive and proactive to ensure the safety of everyone in our communities and get our clients up and running again as soon as possible.

Rather than waiting to see what Harvey would leave behind, our team performed a significant amount of pre-storm work. The team laid out sandbags in problematic areas and prepared the campus for the predicted rainfall. Sump pumps were checked to ensure each was in good working order.

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SSC sent six students to build a clean water well in El Salvador

In August, SSC sent six students to El Salvador with Living Water International, an organization that builds wells across the globe for communities in need of clean water.

Students applied for a scholarship to embark on this journey. Aimee Bourey and Caroline Matlock of Texas A&M College Station, Christine Owojori and Russell Thomas of Prairie View A&M, and Lisseth Diaz and Cesar Villarreal of TAMIU in Laredo made the trip this summer. Sarah Boreen from SSC at TAMU College Station and Ida Noack of Weathermatic joined the students.

SSC funded the trip and Weathermatic sponsored the well. SSC has worked extensively with Weathermatic to make irrigation systems on the TAMU campuses more sustainable. The idea behind the scholarships was to take the savings and bring water to a community in need.

The team spent a week in Puente Viejo in La Paz, El Salvador, a village with a population of 198 living in 36 houses. The students built a well that reached depths of 75 meters, or about 246 feet.

Living Water returned to Puente Viejo soon after the team left to perform a water test. The water tested clean and is ready for the community members to use.

For more stories like this, subscribe to the SSC Monthly newsletter. Get news about the latest trends in education and support services, plus tips from our knowledgeable and experienced staff about how to make your facilities run smoothly — and save money.